Dynamichrome Journal

Tech

Steve Jobs

In 1984, portrait photographer Norman Seeff headed over to Apple Headquaters in Cupertino, California. His task? To photograph the team behind Apple's Macintosh.

Seeff himself gives us an insight into the shoot:

“I began the session by shooting the Mac team at the Apple offices and I could see Steve lurking in the background. It was clear that he was checking out how things were going. We were having tremendous fun and I was getting a lot of spontaneous and joyful shots… My desire with Steve was to engage in a genuine conversation about the world in which he lived and where he was most comfortable, and of course that came down to ideas about the future and where technology could go. These kinds of conversations are not at all heady and definitely require a balance of just having fun and hanging out together. That’s exactly what I was doing with Steve and as the session progressed, he became more and more informal.”

In rare cases, we sometimes look at photographs taken after the 1950s when colour photography was widely available. On this occasion, Seeff's photograph was intended as a fun image to book end a talk given at Apple's Covent Garden store in London on the subject of Digital Colour Reconstruction.

Color Reconstruction Jordan Lloyd
Words Jordan Lloyd, Norman Seeff


Original Photograph by Norman Seeff
Format  Black & White Photograph
Date 1984
Location Apple HQ, Cupertino, California, USA
Source Retronaut

 

Armistice Day

Royal Engineers

At Dynamichrome we are marking Remembrance and Armistice by sharing a series of six photographs we have digitally reconstructed in colour for the Imperial War Museum London.

Battle of Albert. Officers of the Royal Engineers in a communication trench. Rearmost officer wearing Other Ranks tunic. Unidentified headquarters sign in background. 1st July 1916.

Digital Colour Reconstruction by Dynamichrome with ISO Design for First World War Gallery "The Trench" at the Imperial War Museum London.

Color Reconstruction Jordan Lloyd
Words Emily L.W. Kern, IWM


Original Photograph by Royal Engineers No 1 Printing Company
Format  Black & White Photograph
Date July 1916
Location Somme, France
Source The Imperial War Museums, IWM Q 66
 

Remembrance Day

Lancashire Fusiliers

At Dynamichrome we are marking the lead up to Remembrance Day by sharing a series of six photographs we have digitally reconstructed in colour for the Imperial War Museum London.

Men of the Lancashire Fusiliers sit in a muddy puddle on the floor of a front line trench opposite Messines to clean a Lewis gun. Behind them, as the trench bends round to the right, a group of men can be seen standing in the trench, one of them with his bayonet fixed. To the left of the photographs, can be seen the gas alarm horn and wind vane. Several rows of sandbags form the top left-hand edge of the trench.

Digital Colour Reconstruction by Dynamichrome with ISO Design for First World War Gallery "The Trench" at the Imperial War Museum London.

Color Reconstruction Jordan Lloyd
Words Emily L.W. Kern, IWM


Original Photograph by Lieutenant John Warwick Brooke
Format  Black & White Photograph
Date January 1917
Location Messines, Belgium
Source The Imperial War Museums, IWM Q 4649
 

Remembrance Day

Royal Irish Rifles

At Dynamichrome we are marking the lead up to Remembrance Day by sharing a series of six photographs we have digitally reconstructed in colour for the Imperial War Museum London.

Officers of the 12th Royal Irish Rifles wading through the mud of a fallen in communication trench, the result of a thaw after weeks of snow and from Essigny, 7 February 1918. They had recently taken over from the French 6th Division.

Digital Colour Reconstruction by Dynamichrome with ISO Design for First World War Gallery "The Trench" at the Imperial War Museum London.

Color Reconstruction Jordan Lloyd
Words Emily L.W. Kern, IWM


Original Photograph by Second Lieutenant Thomas Keith Aitken
Format  Black & White Photograph
Date February 1918
Location Essigny, France
Source The Imperial War Museums, IWM Q 10681
 

Remembrance Day

Royal Highlanders of Canada

At Dynamichrome we are marking the lead up to Remembrance Day by sharing a series of six photographs we have digitally reconstructed in colour for the Imperial War Museum London. 

On Remembrance Sunday, we feature two men of the 42nd Canadian Infantry Battalion (Royal Highlanders of Canada) clean a Lewis Gun in a reserve trench during the Third Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele), November 1917.

Digital Colour Reconstruction by Dynamichrome with ISO Design for First World War Gallery "The Trench" at the Imperial War Museum London.

Color Reconstruction Jordan Lloyd
Words Emily L.W. Kern


Original Photograph by Rider-Rider, W (Lt)
Format  Black & White Photograph
Date November 1917
Location Ypres, France
Source The Imperial War Museums, IWM CO 2196A
 

Remembrance Day

Royal Fusiliers

Remembrance Day is observed annually on 11 November by Commonwealth and other European nations to honour soldiers who have died in service to their country. The same date is celebrated as Veterans Day in the United States, though this federal holiday pays tribute to all who have served in the U.S. military. Remembrance Day is marked in many Commonwealth nations by formal wreath-laying ceremonies and a two minute silence at 11 a.m., in memory of the armistice of World War I at 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918. In the United Kingdom, local ceremonies often take place on Remembrance Sunday, the one closest to Remembrance Day, when communities gather to lay synthetic poppy wreaths at their war memorials. The red poppy, made famous by the poem "In Flanders Fields," has become a symbol of wartime bloodshed.

At Dynamichrome we are marking the lead up to Remembrance Day by sharing a series of six photographs we have digitally reconstructed in colour for the Imperial War Museum London.

In this photograph, Troops of the 3rd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, 85th Brigade, 28th Division manning a trench near Bairakli Jum'a, May 1917.

Digital Colour Reconstruction by Dynamichrome with ISO Design for First World War Gallery "The Trench" at the Imperial War Museum London.

Color Reconstruction Jordan Lloyd
Words Emily L.W. Kern


Original Photograph by Ariel Varges
Format  Black & White Photograph
Date May 1917
Location Bairakli Jum’a, Macedonia
Source The Imperial War Museums, IWM Q 32896
 

Remembrance Day

Knee Deep in Mud

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row...

"In Flanders Fields," Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae

Remembrance Day is observed annually on 11 November by Commonwealth and other European nations to honour soldiers who have died in service to their country. The same date is celebrated as Veterans Day in the United States, though this federal holiday pays tribute to all who have served in the U.S. military. Remembrance Day is marked in many Commonwealth nations by formal wreath-laying ceremonies and a two minute silence at 11 a.m., in memory of the armistice of World War I at 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918. In the United Kingdom, local ceremonies often take place on Remembrance Sunday, the one closest to Remembrance Day, when communities gather to lay synthetic poppy wreaths at their war memorials. The red poppy, made famous by the poem "In Flanders Fields," has become a symbol of wartime bloodshed.

At Dynamichrome we are marking the lead up to Remembrance Day by sharing a series of six photographs we have digitally reconstructed in colour for the Imperial War Museum London. The first in the series is this informal portrait of Captain Charles Bean. He was an Australian Official War Correspondent, shown here knee-deep in mud in the Gird trench near Gueudecourt, France in the winter of 1916-1917. He survived the war and became instrumental in preserving the history of Australian war efforts in histories, the Australian War Records Section, and the Australian War Memorial.

Digital Colour Reconstruction by Dynamichrome with ISO Design for First World War Gallery "The Trench" at the Imperial War Museum London.

Color Reconstruction Jordan Lloyd
Words Emily L.W. Kern


Original Photograph by Captain Herbert F Baldwin
Format  Black & White Photograph
Date 1916
Location Guerdecourt, France
Source The Imperial War Museums, IWM E(AUS)572
 

Halloween

Bobbing for Apples, c.1940

Five children show their skill in the American Halloween tradition of bobbing for apples. In this game apples are set afloat in a tub of water, and participants must catch the bobbing apples using only their teeth. Easier said than done, especially when trying to keep a dry face!

As with other Halloween traditions such as jack o'lanterns and bonfires, the roots of bobbing for apples go back to Celtic harvest celebrations.  Some scholars suggest that the Celts might also have been influenced by the Roman occupation of Britain 43-410 CE. Romans worshipped Pomona, goddess of orchard fruit, and celebrated her as part of their own harvest rituals. Various aspects of these ancient celebrations survived in many parts of the British Isles, especially in the north, and eventually merged with Christian culture to become more like our modern Halloween.

Halloween became fashionable in 19th century America, partly because of the arrival of Irish and Scottish immigrants, but also because of the power of Victorian marketing. Halloween cards, costumes, and parties were hugely popular, and bobbing for apples was one of the party games that survived the cultural leap. 

America has in turn exported its version of Halloween back to the British Isles and other cultures. While many are sceptical about the commercialisation of the holiday, it might be fair to say that the humour of sticking your head in a bucket of cold water has a timeless appeal.

Color Reconstruction Jordan Lloyd
Words Emily Kern


Original Photograph by Leslie Jones
Format  1 negative : film, black & white ; 3 1/8 x 4 1/4 in.
Date c.1940
Location USA
Source The Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection
 

Native American Life

Hopi Maidens, c.1906

The Hopi - Hopituh Shi-nu-mu, or ‘Peaceful People’ - are a Native American tribe who have long inhabited a large area of America traditionally spanning from Arizona to New Mexico and into Colorado.

The Hopi teenagers sitting upon the rooftop are distinguished by both the white, red and black Atu’u maiden’s manta and the distinctive squash blossom whorl - a symbol of fertility achieved by wrapping their hair around moulds on each side of the head. All maidens of the Hopi would keep their Atu’u until they married, before the manta was handed down to another female member of the family. 

The tribe is one of the Pueblo peoples, who inhabit multi-storied apartments constructed from stone, mud and adobe. The usage of ladders to access the dwellings were a form of security, preventing burglaries and other undesired guests as they had to be lowered down from the inside.

Color Reconstruction Jordan Lloyd
Words Jordan Lloyd


Original Photograph by Edward S. Curtis
Format Photographic Print
Date c.1906
Location Unknown Pueblo, c. New Mexico, USA
Source The Library of Congress, Edward S. Curtis Collection
 

Portraits

Yumqas of the Mamalelekala, 1915

Yumqas of the Mamalelekala, part of the Kwakwaka'wakw peoples that inhabits the Pacific Northwest and present day British Columbia around Vancouver. Following the devastating effects of disease introduced by European settlers around Vancouver that reduced the Kwakwaka'wakw population by three quarters by 1915, when this portrait was taken by Edward Curtis, the population numbered around 2000 people. Notably, for a people who traded wool blankets as a form of currency, Yumqas wears a mantle made of redcedar bark, which was created by peeling long strips from the trees, with the flexible inner layer of the bark shredded. The resulting felted strips could then be plaited, sewn or woven into fabrics.

Curtis utilised photogravure, a photomechanical process where a copper plate is coated with light sensitive gelatine tissue exposed to a film positive. The resulting ‘intaglio’ print could then be reproduced with the continuous tonal range of a photograph. A piece of paper would be applied to the top of the inked copper intaglio, then rolled over to create the photographic print. The continuous tone was so good for its time it was used for original fine art prints and photo-reproductions of paintings. Now, the technique is used for banknotes and passports. The Mamalelekala may have been fascinated by Curtis’ technique, as the Kwakwaka'wakw highly valued copper as part of their economy.

Color Reconstruction Jordan Lloyd
Words Jordan Lloyd


Original Photograph by Edward S. Curtis
Format Photogravure, 192 x 140 mm
Date 1915
Location Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Source University of Southern California Libraries / Museum of Photographic Arts, Gift of Jo and Howard Weiner
 

The Wild West - Arizona, 1937

Welcome to Tombstone

Travellers pass by the Boothill Graveyard, where over two hundred outlaws lay interred - victims or perpetrators of suicides, shootings, hangings. “Boothill” gets its name from the number of men who died in violent circumstances wearing their boots, adding to its considerable reputation of being one of the most dangerous places in the wild west. Amongst the dead are characters bearing names such as Jesse ‘Three Fingered Jack’ (a train robber left to die by his friends in a shootout) Dunlap, Geo. Johnson (hanged by mistake over a horse) and Lester Moore, (died in a shootout over a package) whose memorable marker reads, ‘Here lies Lester Moore, four slugs from a .44, no Les no more’.

The town of Tombstone was also home to Deputy Sheriff Wyatt Earp and John Henry ‘Doc’ Holliday, lawmen of the wild west and notorious gunslingers, immortalised in American culture in countless television and movies after their half a minute gunfight outside a photographers studio near the the O.K. Corral. Today, the town of Tombstone has numerous attractions based on its turbulent history, and if you were wondering if you can carry a replica gun, the official website states, 'Arizona is an open carry state and it is legal to carry firearms in Tombstone, replica or not.'

A catalog of all the deaths at Boothill can be found [here].

Color Reconstruction Jordan Lloyd
Words Jordan Lloyd


Original Photograph by Dorothea Lange
Format 1 negative : nitrate ; 4 x 5 inches or smaller
Date May 1937
Location Cochise County, Arizona, USA
Source Library of Congress / Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection
 

Advertising - North Dakota, 1937

Drink-O-Meter

Cobbs_Creek_Sign_Com.jpg

Taken outside a barber’s shop in North Dakota, advertising thermometers exploded in popularity by the 1920s in the USA. Due to large tracts of the states being rural, early advertisers often struggled to push their wares as news mediums mainly involved catching gossip in local diners or the general store.

At some point, companies figured out that combining an advert with a utilitarian device like a sign or a clock would generate far more longevity and soon companies would brand their thermometers using brand colours or recognisable die cut shapes.

Cobbs Creek, named after a real life location in Philadelphia was produced by the Continental Distilling Company was the whisky making subsidiary of Publicker, a large chemical plant that closed in the 1980s, taking the whisky with it.

Color Reconstruction Jordan Lloyd
Words Jordan Lloyd


Original Photograph by Russell Lee
Format 1 negative : nitrate ; 35 mm
Date November 1937
Location Crosby, North Dakota, USA
Source Library of Congress / Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection
 

Cobbs Creek Drink-O-Meter!

110°F
Mint Julep


1/4 bar spoon sugar. 3 sprigs mint. Fill glass 3/4 full of shaved ice. 1 Jigger Cobbs Creek.

100°F
Bell Ringer


1/2 Jigger of Cobbs Creek. 1/3 Jigger of French Vermouth. 1 bar spoon sugar. 1 dash of Angostura bitters. Ice, mix and strain into glass.

90°F
Horse’s Neck


Peel lemon into one long string. Put peel in tall glass so that one end hangs over edge. Add ice cubes and 1 measure of Cobbs Creek. Fill glass with ginger ale.

80°F
Mint Smash


Lump of sugar in a little carbonated water. 4 sprigs mint, bruised with muddier. 1 cube ice. 1 Jigger Cobbs Creek. Add lemon peel and orange slices.

70°F
Highball


Use a tall glass. Fill with ice. Add a measure as much as desired of Cobbs Creek. Add ginger ale or sparkling water, whichever you prefer.

60°F
Whisky and Soda


Use a tall glass. Fill 3/4 full of cracked ice. Add a measure of Cobbs Creek. Fill glass with soda or carbonated water. Add lemon peel if desired.

40°F
Manhattan


Fill large glass with ice. 2 dashes Angostura bitters. 1/3 Jigger Cobbs Creek. 1/3 Jigger Italian Vermouth. Stir and Strain. Serve in cocktail glass.

20°F
Old Fashioned


Old-fashioned glass. Melt lump of sugar in a little water. 2 dashes each of Angostura, Orange bitters. 1 Jigger Cobbs Creek. 2 cubes of ice. Stir, add lemon peel.

American Life – New York City, 1942

Red Hot Frankfurters

Pictured is Lee Ah Ding and Yee Chee Ching by a Red Hot Frankfurters stall, trying American street food for the first time. The pair are the first Chinese seamen to be granted shore leave in New York City during World War II.

Lee, left, refused a Red Hot Frankfurter, but drank the Pepsi Cola with relish - it would be another forty years before Pepsi would be introduced to China, and remains one of the best selling drinks in the world. Bob's Cola, a brand new soda manufacturer, lasted less than 20 years, closing in 1955.

Color Reconstruction Jordan Lloyd
Words Jordan Lloyd


Original Photograph by Edward Gruber
Format 1 negative : nitrate ; 4 x 5 inches or smaller
Date 1942
Location New York City, USA
Source Library of Congress / Office of War Information
 

World War II – Normandy, June 12th, 1944

Beached

Jeeps of the 261st Amphibious Medical Battalion's A-Company race across Utah Beach to deliver front line casualties to the waiting Landing Ship Tank USS-134 for transport to hospitals in Great Britain. 

Operation Neptune, more commonly known as D-Day, occurred just under one week before this photograph was taken. This invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe by Allied Forces on 6 June 1944 saw 5,000 vessels carrying more than 160,000 troops make landfall in France on the first day.

Over the course of the summer, more than 3 million Allied soldiers made their way into France. USS LST-134, which had been built almost a year prior, would also see action in the invasion of southern France and the occupation of Okinawa halfway across the world a year later.

Color Reconstruction Jordan Lloyd
Words Emily Kern


Original Photograph by David Kerr
Format Unknown
Date Monday 12th June, 1944
Location Utah Beach, France
Source NavSource